I don’t seem to have read much this week, maybe because I went out one night and I’ve had quite a lot of work on, although I’ve written a post for Non-fiction November at least (I’m so enjoying taking part in this themed reading and blogging series!). I have read a bit more yesterday and today though and finished this one. And the last books I read were for NetGalley and I like to keep those ones free of random book acquisition chat, so see below for some incomings e-book and tree-book …

Simon Napier-Bell – “Ta-ra-ra-BOOM-de-ay”

(22 May 2018)

Almost the last of my May 2018 massive book haul from Foyles, which did include three books on music I’m having to spread out a bit. This one is subtitled “The (Dodgy) Business of Popular Music” and it’s a history of the business side of music – so publishing, record labels, promoters and managers – although it was a bit dispiriting to read that greed and payola have basically always run both the business and the choice of the songs we hear and notice. As a quote from music sociologist Dr Isaac Goldberg from the 1930s has it-

Everything we ever sing or whistle is the end result of a huge plot involving thousands of dollars and thousands of organised agents … the efforts of organised pluggery. (p. 288)

Everything has always been made as easy as possible, from simple sheet music onwards through to the non-threatening pabulum of the modern hit machine.

It’s good on the sociology behind new trends and fads, which the business kept up with until file-sharing, always edging in – for example the Tube being constructed meant people could come in from the suburbs to see shows and then buy the music, and the rise of colour TV ownership coincided with the launch of MTV. The changes in radio formats were interesting, with DJs coming in fairly late and amazing amounts of bribery going on. I did get lost in the machinations of the record labels but it’s all laid out for us.

The book was published in 2014 so streaming had not been going on long and it doesn’t cover this new development. I also noticed a few inaccuracies or oddities (Deadmau5 being spelled incorrectly; something weird about digital rights management on CDs letting viruses get into people’s computers and a claim that New Order’s “World in Motion” included the phrase “E for England” – I didn’t recall this and found it was only in the draft lyrics) which meant that I was slightly more wary of all the other assertions than I might otherwise have been. But an interesting read all told.


I had some nice book post in the last week or so. I needed to replace my lost (how?) original copy of Iris Murdoch’s “The Flight from the Enchanter” and some detective work in the IM group on Facebook found the date of the edition with the cover I had. Hooray! And my friend Zoe sent me Tayari Jones’ “An American Marriage” which she and a few other friends have read and recommended. It’s the one about a black couple where the husband suddenly gets sent to prison for a crime he didn’t commit and looks really good and important.

Then I feel duty-bound to record three new wins on NetGalley. “Miss Iceland is by Audur Ava Olafsdottir, whose “Butterflies in November” I enjoyed, and takes a trip to 1960s Iceland and a life of writing and expectations. Kiley Reid’s “Such a Fun Age” is a novel of modern issues, where an online influencer’s black babysitter is confronted for having charge of her two (white) children and the mum tries to make things right when she can’t really. “Tiny Habits” by B.J. Fogg is about how we can make small changes in our lives for the positive. So quite a range there!

Oops – edited to add I also received a lovely email from the folks at the Furrowed Middlebrow imprint of Dean Street Press with three excellent looking books which will be out in January. They chose to send me D. E. Stevenson’s “Vittoria Cottage”, first in her Dering Trilogy and I bet I find myself collecting the lot, Miss Read’s “Fresh from the Country” which is a standalone story about a new schoolteacher, and Doris Langley Moore’s “Not at Home” which is a just post-WWII story about renting part of one’s home to a relative stranger …

Have you read any of these?