A double review of two good reads I’ve powered through this week. The first one got me through the flight from Spain back to the UK and the second had to be picked off the TBR and devoured so I found out what happened to all the characters. I’ve already read and reviewed the two previous books in the series: I bought “The Little Bookshop of Lonely Hearts” because I’d won “True Love at the Lonely Hearts Bookshop” on NetGally, and, in fact, I spotted “A Winter Kiss” in The Works and bought a second-hand copy of “Crazy in Love” so I could slot that one in and read them in the right order!

Annie Darling – “Crazy in Love at the Lonely Hearts Bookshop”

(18 Oct 2019)

Each book of this series focuses on one member of staff of the romantic fiction bookshop and their loves and losses. We already have Posy, who inherited the bookshop and the owner’s grandson, and introvert Verity, who rules online ordering and health and safety with a rod of iron, settled down, and now we get to know Nina better. Nina’s all tattoos, innuendo, pastel hair and extravagant retro wardrobe, but she’s becoming a bit fed up with her life of app dating. Just to throw her woes into focus, the shop has a management consultant come in to see how things could be run better. With his sober suits and ever-present iPad for notes, Noah, is bound to rub Nina up the wrong way – but surely she knows him from somewhere. Well, she does, and when she realises from where, she gets all caught up in a web of lies by omission, just as they draw closer.

I loved Nina’s personality and her friends, the tattooist and retro clothes pusher, were a nice new couple of characters. I also really like all the Easter Eggs the author inserts – the pub they all go to after work is The Midnight Bell, which is the pub in Patrick Hamilton’s novels (I really hope that was on purpose, anyway!). Verity stays on brand and refuses to tackle Nina’s packing and there’s a lovely trip to one of her favourite places.

Annie Darling – “A Winter Kiss in Rochester Mews”

(09 October 2019)

In this novel we concentrate on half-French Mattie, who runs the tea shop next to the bookshop with the assistance of pensioner Cuthbert and his granddaughter, Little Sophie (who has been in the books since the beginning). Next door, the only person not now paired up is tweedy Tom, whose home life and background are a mystery and who has always been acting a bit posh and ‘lofty’ around the other gossipy and oversharing staff. When Nina decides to move out of the flat above the shop, there’s a fight over her room and then an uneasy truce. Will being flatmates thaw Mattie’s icy reserve or bring Tom down a peg?

Tom turns out not to be the lothario he appears when set against his very amusing friends, the Bantmeisters. Funnily enough, if you have been watching carefully, Tom was hissing about heteronormativity when it was assumed he knew the answers to the football questions at the pub quiz because he’s a man. And in fact this book is quite a lot about the performance of masculinity, with the Archbishop of Banterbury (aka Phil) getting lessons on not objectifying women and Tom correctly identifying a gaslighter. Although these are light novels to pass the time with, my library and information studies senses prickled (my unfinished Master’s dissertation research was on where best to put information for women experiencing domestic violence) as, much as another dissertation mentioned in the novel says, there’s more depth to romantic fiction than meets the eye.

We have more Easter Eggs – someone has parents called Margot and Jerry! – and commentary on romantic fiction, as Mattie discovers a whole slew of fiction written about women starting bakeries and cake shops: if you’ve ever wandered into The Works you can see quite clearly the trends that sweep across the genre.  Even Virago Modern Classics and their green spines are mentioned, when Nina creates a Christmas tree for the shop window out of books.

An ideal Christmas read, but do read the others in the series first, they’re very much worth it!


A couple of lovely incomings which bookended (haha) our Spanish trip. Cari sent me Ron Rubin’s “Anything for a T-shirt: Fred Lebow and the New York City Marathon” with the aim that we read it together (although her copy hasn’t arrived yet). Fred is a big hero of Cari’s and she recently ran NYC so I’m really looking forward to finding out more. And waiting for me when I got home was Noel Streatfeild’s “Christmas Stories” which is a lovely-looking collection of stories Streatfeild wrote for various magazines and annuals, never before collected together, sent to me by dear Verity. I definitely plan to read that on Christmas afternoon.

Do you have a Christmas reading plan? Any series of books I should know about? (I have another set of Philippa Ashleys, one of which features Christmas, and another light novel, so will have a bit of a theme around the day for once!