I’m shamefully late with this review – you can probably tell I’ve been delving away in the latter pages of my Kindle this week, as well as reading some of my newer acquisitions, as I felt I’d been neglecting my NetGalley wins. Thank you to Ebury Publishing for letting me read this book via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Annie Lowry – “Give People Money”

(4 July 2018, NetGalley)

A book discussing the principle of universal basic income – i.e. everyone gets it, it only covers the complete basics, a room, food and transport, and it’s income – how it would address employment, income and equality and what the pitfalls might be.

It’s not too dry (I mean, I don’t find economics dry but some people might do), as it looks at plenty of examples from around the world, although the discussion of the introduction of a UBI is US-centric. It throws into relief the differences of the US from Europe, etc. in terms of attitudes to poverty as being people’s own fault, and in spending on supporting its citizens and in institutional racism.

The basic tenet of the book is that what we think of as economic circumstances are actually a product of policy choices, using North and South Korea as a useful example. Looking at practical examples of UBIs, she points out that 130 of the world’s low and middle income countries provide some form of it, but more wealthy countries decide not to. But she is clear-sighted about the challenges, for example from her time spent studying the topic in India (people’s money being accessible through only one shop; frequent Internet outages …).

The book concludes with the statement that it’s not just a UBI that’s needed, but

A broader change in our understanding of worth and compensation, of work and labor, would also be necessary.”

Fascinating stuff, especially as this was an older book in the roster which obviously I must have been interested in in the first place, but could have been a dud!